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Nedan är en fullständig innehållsförteckning för "US Navy Diving Manual – Revision 5" återgiven för den som vill titta närmare på innehållet:



VOLUME 1

1 HISTORY OF DIVING
1-1 INTRODUCTION
1-1.1 Purpose
1-1.2 Scope
1-1.3 Role of the U.S. Navy
1-2 SURFACE-SUPPLIED AIR DIVING
1-2.1 Breathing Tubes
1-2.2 Breathing Bags
1-2.3 Diving Bells
1-2.4 Diving Dress Designs
1-2.4.1 Lethbridge’s Diving Dress
1-2.4.2 Deane’s Patented Diving Dress
1-2.4.3 Siebe’s Improved Diving Dress
1-2.4.4 Salvage of the HMS Royal George
1-2.5 Caissons
1-2.6 Physiological Discoveries
1-2.6.1 Caisson Disease (Decompression Sickness)
1-2.6.2 Inadequate Ventilation
1-2.6.3 Nitrogen Narcosis
1-2.7 Armored Diving Suits
1-2.8 MK V Deep-Sea Diving Dress
1-3 SCUBA DIVING
1-3.1 Open-Circuit SCUBA
1-3.1.1 Rouquayrol’s Demand Regulator
1-3.1.2 LePrieur’s Open-Circuit SCUBA Design
1-3.1.3 Cousteau and Gagnan’s Aqua-Lung
1-3.1.4 Impact of SCUBA on Diving
1-3.2 Closed-Circuit SCUBA
1-3.2.1 Fleuss’ Closed-Circuit SCUBA
1-3.2.2 Modern Closed-Circuit Systems
1-3.3 Hazards of Using Oxygen in SCUBA
1-3.4 Semiclosed-Circuit SCUBA
1-3.4.1 Lambertsen’s Mixed-Gas Rebreather
1-3.4.2 MK 6 UBA
1-3.5 SCUBA Use During World War II
1-3.5.1 Diver-Guided Torpedoes
1-3.5.2 U.S. Combat Swimming
1-3.5.3 Underwater Demolition
1-4 MIXED-GAS DIVING
1-4.1 Nonsaturation Diving
1-4.1.1 Helium-Oxygen (HeO2) Diving
1-4.1.2 Hydrogen-Oxygen Diving
1-4.1.3 Modern Surface-Supplied Mixed-Gas Diving
1-4.1.4 MK 1 MOD 0 Diving Outfit
1-4.2 Diving Bells
1-4.3 Saturation Diving
1-4.3.1 Advantages of Saturation Diving
1-4.3.2 Bond’s Saturation Theory
1-4.3.3 Genesis Project
1-4.3.4 Developmental Testing
1-4.3.5 Sealab Program
1-4.4 Deep Diving Systems (DDS)
1-4.4.1 ADS-IV
1-4.4.2 MK 1 MOD 0
1-4.4.3 MK 2 MOD 0
1-4.4.4 MK 2 MOD 1
1-5 SUBMARINE SALVAGE AND RESCUE
1-5.1 USS F-4
1-5.2 USS S-51
1-5.3 USS S-4
1-5.4 USS Squalus
1-5.5 USS Thresher
1-5.6 Deep Submergence Systems Project
1-6 SALVAGE DIVING
1-6.1 World War II Era.
1-6.1.1 Pearl Harbor
1-6.1.2 USS Lafayette
1-6.1.3 Other Diving Missions
1-6.2 Vietnam Era
1-7 OPEN-SEA DEEP DIVING RECORDS
1-8 SUMMARY

2 UNDERWATER PHYSICS
2-1 INTRODUCTION
2-1.1 Purpose
2-1.2 Scope
2-2 PHYSICS
2-3 MATTER
2-3.1 Elements
2-3.2 Atoms
2-3.3 Molecules
2-3.4 The Three States of Matter
2-4 MEASUREMENT
2-4.1 Measurement Systems
2-4.2 Temperature Measurements
2-4.2.1 Kelvin Scale
2-4.2.2 Rankine Scale
2-4.3 Gas Measurements
2-5 ENERGY
2-5.1 Conservation of Energy
2-5.2 Classifications of Energy
2-6 LIGHT ENERGY IN DIVING
2-6.1 Refraction
2-6.2 Turbidity of Water
2-6.3 Diffusion
2-6.4 Color Visibility
2-7 MECHANICAL ENERGY IN DIVING
2-7.1 Water Temperature and Sound
2-7.2 Water Depth and Sound
2-7.2.1 Diver Work and Noise
2-7.2.2 Pressure Waves
2-7.3 Underwater Explosions
2-7.3.1 Type of Explosive and Size of the Charge
2-7.3.2 Characteristics of the Seabed
2-7.3.3 Location of the Explosive Charge
2-7.3.4 Water Depth
2-7.3.5 Distance from the Explosion
2-7.3.6 Degree of Submersion of the Diver
2-7.3.7 Estimating Explosion Pressure on a Diver
2-7.3.8 Minimizing the Effects of an Explosion
2-8 HEAT ENERGY IN DIVING
2-8.1 Conduction, Convection, and Radiation
2-8.2 Heat Transfer Rate
2-8.3 Diver Body Temperature
2-9 PRESSURE IN DIVING
2-9.1 Atmospheric Pressure
2-9.2 Terms Used to Describe Gas Pressure
2-9.3 Hydrostatic Pressure
2-9.4 Buoyancy
2-9.4.1 Archimedes’ Principle
2-9.4.2 Diver Buoyancy
2-10 GASES IN DIVING
2-10.1 Atmospheric Air
2-10.2 Oxygen
2-10.3 Nitrogen
2-10.4 Helium
2-10.5 Hydrogen
2-10.6 Neon
2-10.7 Carbon Dioxide
2-10.8 Carbon Monoxide
2-10.9 Kinetic Theory of Gases
2-11 GAS LAWS
2-11.1 Boyle’s Law
2-11.2 Charles’/Gay-Lussac’s Law
2-11.3 The General Gas Law
2-12 GAS MIXTURES
2-12.1 Dalton’s Law
2-12.1.1 Expressing Small Quantities of Pressure
2-12.1.2 Calculating Surface Equivalent Value
2-12.2 Gas Diffusion
2-12.3 Humidity
2-12.4 Gases in Liquids.
2-12.5 Solubility
2-12.6 Henry’s Law
2-12.6.1 Gas Tension
2-12.6.2 Gas Absorption
2-12.6.3 Gas Solubility

3 UNDERWATER PHYSIOLOGY AND DIVING DISORDERS
3-1 INTRODUCTION
3-1.1 Purpose
3-1.2 Scope
3-1.3 General
3-2 THE NERVOUS SYSTEM
3-3 THE CIRCULATORY SYSTEM
3-3.1 Anatomy
3-3.1.1 The Heart
3-3.1.2 The Pulmonary and Systemic Circuits
3-3.2 Circulatory Function
3-3.3 Blood Components
3-4 THE RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
3-4.1 Gas Exchange
3-4.2 Respiration Phases
3-4.3 Upper and Lower Respiratory Tract
3-4.4 The Respiratory Apparatus
3-4.4.1 The Chest Cavity
3-4.4.2 The Lungs
3-4.5 Respiratory Tract Ventilation Definitions
3-4.6 Alveolar/Capillary Gas Exchange
3-4.7 Breathing Control
3-4.8 Oxygen Consumption
3-5 RESPIRATORY PROBLEMS IN DIVING
3-5.1 Oxygen Deficiency (Hypoxia)
3-5.1.1 Causes of Hypoxia
3-5.1.2 Symptoms of Hypoxia
3-5.1.3 Treatment of Hypoxia
3-5.1.4 Prevention of Hypoxia
3-5.2 Carbon Dioxide Retention (Hypercapnia)
3-5.2.1 Causes of Hypercapnia
3-5.2.2 Symptoms of Hypercapnia
3-5.2.3 Treatment of Hypercapnia
3-5.2.4 Prevention of Hypercapnia
3-5.3 Asphyxia
3-5.4 Drowning/Near Drowning
3-5.4.1 Causes of Drowning
3-5.4.2 Symptoms of Drowning/Near Drowning
3-5.4.3 Treatment of Near Drowning
3-5.4.4 Prevention of Near Drowning
3-5.5 Breathholding and Unconsciousness
3-5.6 Involuntary Hyperventilation
3-5.6.1 Causes of Involuntary Hyperventilation
3-5.6.2 Symptoms of Involuntary Hyperventilation
3-5.6.3 Treatment of Involuntary Hyperventilation
3-5.7 Overbreathing the Rig
3-5.8 Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
3-5.8.1 Causes of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
3-5.8.2 Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
3-5.8.3 Treatment of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
3-5.8.4 Prevention of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning
3-6 MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF PRESSURE ON THE HUMAN BODY-BAROTRAUMA DURING DESCENT
3-6.1 Prerequisites for Squeeze
3-6.2 Middle Ear Squeeze
3-6.2.1 Preventing Middle Ear Squeeze
3-6.2.2 Treating Middle Ear Squeeze
3-6.3 Sinus Squeeze
3-6.3.1 Causes of Sinus Squeeze
3-6.3.2 Preventing Sinus Squeeze
3-6.4 Tooth Squeeze (Barodontalgia)
3-6.5 External Ear Squeeze
3-6.6 Thoracic (Lung) Squeeze
3-6.7 Face or Body Squeeze
3-6.8 Inner Ear Barotrauma
3-7 MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF PRESSURE ON THE HUMAN BODY—BAROTRAUMA DURING ASCENT
3-7.1 Middle Ear Overpressure (Reverse Middle Ear Squeeze)
3-7.2 Sinus Overpressure (Reverse Sinus Squeeze)
3-7.3 Gastrointestinal Distention
3-8 PULMONARY OVERINFLATION SYNDROMES
3-8.1 Arterial Gas Embolism (AGE).
3-8.1.1 Causes of AGE
3-8.1.2 Symptoms of AGE
3-8.1.3 Treatment of AGE
3-8.1.4 Prevention of AGE
3-8.2 Mediastinal and Subcutaneous Emphysema
3-8.2.1 Causes of Mediastinal / Subcutaneous Emphysema
3-8.2.2 Symptoms of Mediastinal Subcutaneous Emphysema
3-8.2.3 Treatment of Mediastinal and Subcutaneous Emphysema
3-8.2.4 Prevention of Mediastinal / Subcutaneous Emphysema
3-8.3 Pneumothorax
3-8.3.1 Causes of Pneumothorax
3-8.3.2 Symptoms of Pneumothorax
3-8.3.3 Treatment of Pneumothorax
3-8.3.4 Prevention of Pneumothorax
3-9 INDIRECT EFFECTS OF PRESSURE ON THE HUMAN BODY
3-9.1 Nitrogen Narcosis
3-9.1.1 Causes of Nitrogen Narcosis
3-9.1.2 Symptoms of Nitrogen Narcosis
3-9.1.3 Treatment of Nitrogen narcosis
3-9.1.4 Prevention of Nitrogen Narcosis
3-9.2 Oxygen Toxicity
3-9.2.1 Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity
3-9.2.2 Central Nervous System (CNS) Oxygen Toxicity
3-9.3 Decompression Sickness (DCS)
3-9.3.1 Absorption and Elimination of Inert Gases
3-9.3.2 Bubble Formation
3-9.3.3 Direct Bubble Effects
3-9.3.4 Indirect Bubble Effects
3-9.3.5 Symptoms of Decompression Sickness
3-9.3.6 Treating Decompression Sickness
3-9.3.7 Preventing Decompression Sickness
3-10 THERMAL PROBLEMS IN DIVING
3-10.1 Regulating Body Temperature
3-10.2 Excessive Heat Loss (Hypothermia)
3-10.2.1 Causes of Hypothermia
3-10.2.2 Symptoms of Hypothermia
3-10.2.3 Treatment of Hypothermia
3-10.2.4 Prevention of Hypothermia
3-10.3 Other Physiological Effects of Exposure to Cold Water
3-10.3.1 Caloric Vertigo
3-10.3.2 Diving Reflex
3-10.3.3 Uncontrolled Hyperventilation
3-10.4 Excessive Heat Gain (Hyperthermia)
3-10.4.1 Causes of Hyperthermia
3-10.4.2 Symptoms of Hyperthermia
3-10.4.3 Treatment of Hyperthermia
3-10.4.4 Prevention of Hyperthermia
3-11 SPECIAL MEDICAL PROBLEMS ASSOCIATED WITH DEEP DIVING
3-11.1 High Pressure Nervous Syndrome (HPNS)
3-11.2 Compression Arthralgia
3-12 OTHER DIVING MEDICAL PROBLEMS
3-12.1 Dehydration
3-12.1.1 Causes of Dehydration
3-12.1.2 Preventing Dehydration
3-12.2 Immersion Pulmonary Edema
3-12.3 Carotid Sinus Reflex
3-12.4 Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome.
3-12.4.1 Symptoms of Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
3-12.4.2 Treating Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
3-12.5 Underwater Trauma
3-12.6 Blast Injury
3-12.7 Otitis Externa
3-12.8 Hypoglycemia

4 DIVE SYSTEMS
4-1 INTRODUCTION
4-1.1 Purpose
4-1.2 Scope
4-2 GENERAL INFORMATION
4-2.1 Document Precedence
4-2.2 Equipment Authorized For Navy Use (ANU)
4-2.3 System Certification Authority (SCA)
4-2.4 Planned Maintenance System
4-2.5 Alteration of Diving Equipment
4-2.5.1 Technical Program Managers for Shore-Based Systems
4-2.5.2 Technical Program Managers for Other Diving Apparatus
4-2.6 Operating and Emergency Procedures
4-2.6.1 Standardized OP/EPs
4-2.6.2 Non-standardized OP/EPs
4-2.6.3 OP/EP Approval Process
4-2.6.4 Format
4-2.6.5 Example
4-3 DIVER’S BREATHING GAS PURITY STANDARDS
4-3.1 Diver’s Breathing Air
4-3.2 Diver’s Breathing Oxygen
4-3.3 Diver’s Breathing Helium
4-3.4 Diver’s Breathing Nitrogen
4-4 DIVER’S AIR SAMPLING PROGRAM
4-4.1 Maintenance Requirements
4-4.2 General Air Sampling Procedures
4-4.3 NSWC- PC Air Sampling Services
4-4.4 Local Air Sampling Services
4-5 DIVING COMPRESSORS
4-5.1 Equipment Requirements
4-5.2 Air Filtration System
4-5.3 Lubrication
4-6 DIVING GAUGES
4-6.1 Selecting Diving System Guages
4-6.2 Calibrating and Maintaining Gauges
4-6.3 Helical Bourdon Tube Gauges
4-7 COMPRESSED GAS HANDLING AND STORAGE

5 DIVE PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION
5-1 INTRODUCTION
5-1.1 Purpose
5-1.2 Scope
5-2 OBJECTIVES OF THE RECORD KEEPING AND REPORTING SYSTEM
5-3 RECORD KEEPING AND REPORTING DOCUMENTS
5-4 COMMAND SMOOTH DIVING LOG
5-5 RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER LOG
5-6 DIVER'S PERSONAL DIVE LOG
5-7 DIVING MISHAP/CASUALTY REPORTING
5-8 EQUIPMENT FAILURE OR DEFICIENCY REPORTING
5-9 U.S. NAVY DIVE REPORTING SYSTEM (DRS)
5-10 ACCIDENT/INCIDENT EQUIPMENT INVESTIGATION REQUIREMENTS
5-11 REPORTING CRITERIA
5-12 ACTIONS REQUIRED
5-12.1 Technical Manual Deficiency/Evaluation Report
5-12.2 Shipment of Equipment

VOLUME 1 – Appendix

Appendix 1A SAFE DIVING DISTANCES FROM TRANSMITTING SONAR
Appendix 1A-1 INTRODUCTION
Appendix 1A-2 BACKGROUND
Appendix 1A-3 ACTION
Appendix 1A-4 SONAR DIVING DISTANCES WORKSHEETS WITH DIRECTIONS FOR USE
Appendix 1A-4.1 General Information/Introduction
Appendix 1A-4.1.1 Effects of Exposure
Appendix 1A-4.1.2 Suit and Hood Characteristics
Appendix 1A-4.1.3 In-Water Hearing vs. In-Gas Hearing
Appendix 1A-4.2 Directions for Completing the Sonar Diving Distances Worksheet
Appendix 1A-5 GUIDANCE FOR DIVER EXPOSURE TO LOW-FREQUENCY SONAR (160–320 Hz)
Appendix 1A-6 GUIDANCE FOR DIVER EXPOSURE TO ULTRASONIC SONAR (250 KHz AND GREATER)
Appendix 1B REFERENCES
Appendix 1C TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Appendix 1D LIST OF ACRONYMS



VOLUME 2

6 OPERATIONAL PLANNING AND RISK MANAGEMENT
6-1 INTRODUCTION
6-1.1 Purpose
6-1.2 Scope
6-2 MISSION OBJECTIVE AND OPERATIONAL TASKS
6-2.1 Underwater Ship Husbandry (UWSH)
6-2.1.1 Objective of UWSH Operations
6-2.1.2 Repair Requirements
6-2.1.3 Diver Training and Qualification Requirements
6-2.1.4 Training Program Requirements
6-2.2 Salvage/Object Recovery
6-2.3 Search Missions
6-2.4 Explosive Ordnance Disposal
6-2.5 Security Swims
6-2.6 Underwater Construction
6-2.6.1 Diver Training and Qualification Requirements
6-2.6.2 Equipment Requirements
6-2.6.3 Underwater Construction Planning Resources
6-2.7 Demolition Missions
6-2.8 Combat Swimmer Missions
6-2.9 Enclosed Space Diving
6-3 GENERAL PLANNING AND ORM PROCESS
6-3.1 Concept of ORM:
6-3.2 Risk Management Terms:
6-3.3 ORM Process
6-4 COLLECT AND ANALYZE DATA
6-4.1 Information Gathering
6-4.2 Planning Data
6-4.3 Object Recovery
6-4.3.1 Searching for Objects or Underwater Sites
6-4.4 Data Required for All Diving Operations
6-4.4.1 Surface Conditions
6-4.4.2 Depth.
6-4.4.3 Type of Bottom
6-4.4.4 Tides and Currents
6-5 IDENTIFY OPERATIONAL HAZARDS
6-5.1 Underwater Visibility
6-5.2 Temperature
6-5.3 Warm Water Diving
6-5.3.1 Operational Guidelines and Safety Precautions
6-5.3.2 Mission Planning Factors
6-5.4 Contaminated Water
6-5.5 Chemical Contamination
6-5.6 Biological Contamination
6-5.7 Altitude Diving
6-5.8 Underwater Obstacles
6-5.9 Electrical Shock Hazards
6-5.9.1 Reducing Electrical Shock Hazards
6-5.9.2 Securing Electrical Equipment
6-5.10 Explosions
6-5.11 Sonar
6-5.12 Nuclear Radiation
6-5.13 Marine Life
6-5.14 Vessels and Small Boat Traffic
6-5.15 Territorial Waters
6-6 SELECT DIVING TECHNIQUE
6-6.1 Factors to Consider when Selecting the Diving Technique
6-6.2 Breathhold Diving Restrictions
6-6.3 Operational Characteristics of SCUBA
6-6.3.1 Mobility
6-6.3.2 Buoyancy
6-6.3.3 Portability
6-6.3.4 Operational Limitations
6-6.3.5 Environmental Protection
6-6.4 Operational Characteristics of SSDS
6-6.4.1 Mobility
6-6.4.2 Buoyancy
6-6.4.3 Operational Limitations
6-6.4.4 Environmental Protection
6-7 SELECT EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
6-7.1 Equipment Authorized for Navy Use
6-7.2 Air Supply
6-7.3 Diving Craft and Platforms
6-7.4 Deep-Sea Salvage/Rescue Diving Platforms
6-7.5 Small Craft
6-8 SELECT AND ASSEMBLE THE DIVING TEAM
6-8.1 Manning Levels
6-8.2 Commanding Officer
6-8.3 Command Diving Officer
6-8.4 Watchstation Diving Officer
6-8.5 Master Diver
6-8.5.1 Master Diver Responsibilities
6-8.5.2 Master Diver Qualifications
6-8.6 Diving Supervisor
6-8.6.1 Pre-dive Responsibilities
6-8.6.2 Responsibilities While Operation is Underway
6-8.6.3 Post-dive Responsibilities
6-8.6.4 Diving Supervisor Qualifications
6-8.7 Diving Medical Officer
6-8.8 Diving Personnel
6-8.8.1 Diving Personnel Responsibilities
6-8.8.2 Diving Personnel Qualifications
6-8.8.3 Standby Diver
6-8.8.4 Buddy Diver
6-8.8.5 Diver Tender
6-8.8.6 Recorder
6-8.8.7 Medical Personnel
6-8.8.8 Other Support Personnel
6-8.8.9 Cross-Training and Substitution
6-8.8.10 Physical Condition
6-8.8.11 Underwater Salvage or Construction Demolition Personnel
6-8.8.12 Blasting Plan
6-8.8.13 Explosive Handlers
6-8.9 OSHA Requirements for U.S. Navy Civilian Diving
6-8.9.1 Scuba Diving (Air) Restriction
6-8.9.2 Surface Supplied Air Diving Restrictions
6-8.9.3 Mixed Gas Diving Restrictions
6-8.9.4 Recompression Chamber Requirements
6-9 ORGANIZE AND SCHEDULE OPERATIONS
6-9.1 Task Planning and Scheduling
6-9.2 Post-dive Tasks
6-10 BRIEF THE DIVING TEAM
6-10.1 Establish Mission Objective
6-10.2 Identify Tasks and Procedures
6-10.3 Review Diving Procedures
6-10.4 Assignment of Personnel
6-10.5 Assistance and Emergencies.
6-10.6 Notification of Ship's Personnel
6-10.7 Fouling and Entrapment
6-10.8 Equipment Failure
6-10.8.1 Loss of Gas Supply
6-10.8.2 Loss of Communications
6-10.9 Lost Diver
6-10.10 Debriefing the Diving Team
6-11 AIR DIVING EQUIPMENT REFERENCE DATA

7 SCUBA AIR DIVING OPERATIONS
7-1 INTRODUCTION
7-1.1 Purpose
7-1.2 Scope
7-2 REQUIRED EQUIPMENT FOR SCUBA OPERATIONS
7-2.1 Equipment Authorized for Navy Use
7-2.2 Open-Circuit SCUBA
7-2.2.1 Demand Regulator Assembly
7-2.2.2 Cylinders
7-2.2.3 Cylinder Valves and Manifold Assemblies
7-2.2.4 Backpack or Harness
7-2.3 Minimum Equipment
7-2.3.1 Face Mask
7-2.3.2 Life Preserver
7-2.3.3 Buoyancy Compensator
7-2.3.4 Weight Belt
7-2.3.5 Knife
7-2.3.6 Swim Fins
7-2.3.7 Wrist Watch
7-2.3.8 Depth Gauge
7-3 OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT FOR SCUBA OPERATIONS
7-3.1 Protective Clothing
7-3.1.1 Wet Suits
7-3.1.2 Dry Suits
7-3.1.3 Gloves
7-3.1.4 Writing Slate
7-3.1.5 Signal Flare
7-3.1.6 Acoustic Beacons
7-3.1.7 Lines and Floats
7-3.1.8 Snorkel
7-3.1.9 Compass
7-3.1.10 Submersible Cylinder Pressure Gauge
7-4 AIR SUPPLY
7-4.1 Duration of Air Supply
7-4.2 Compressed Air from Commercial Sources
7-4.3 Methods for Charging SCUBA Cylinders
7-4.4 Operating Procedures for Charging SCUBA Tanks
7-4.4.1 Topping off the SCUBA Cylinder
7-4.5 Safety Precautions for Charging and Handling Cylinders
7-5 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
7-5.1 Equipment Preparation
7-5.1.1 Air Cylinders
7-5.1.2 Harness Straps and Backpack
7-5.1.3 Breathing Hoses
7-5.1.4 Regulator
7-5.1.5 Life Preserver/Buoyancy Compensator (BC)
7-5.1.6 Face Mask
7-5.1.7 Swim Fins
7-5.1.8 Dive Knife
7-5.1.9 Snorkel
7-5.1.10 Weight Belt
7-5.1.11 Submersible Wrist Watch
7-5.1.12 Depth Gauge and Compass
7-5.1.13 Miscellaneous Equipment
7-5.2 Diver Preparation and Brief
7-5.3 Donning Gear
7-5.4 Predive Inspection
7-6 WATER ENTRY AND DESCENT
7-6.1 Water Entry
7-6.1.1 Step-In Method
7-6.1.2 Rear Roll Method
7-6.1.3 Entering the Water from the Beach
7-6.2 Pre-descent Surface Check
7-6.3 Surface Swimming
7-6.4 Descent
7-7 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
7-7.1 Breathing Technique
7-7.2 Mask Clearing
7-7.3 Hose and Mouthpiece Clearing
7-7.4 Swimming Technique
7-7.5 Diver Communications
7-7.5.1 Through-Water Communication Systems
7-7.5.2 Hand and Line-Pull Signals
7-7.6 Buddy Diver Responsibilities
7-7.7 Buddy Breathing Procedure
7-7.8 Tending
7-7.8.1 Tending with a Surface or Buddy Line
7-7.8.2 Tending with No Surface Line
7-7.9 Working with Tools
7-7.10 Adapting to Underwater Conditions
7-8 ASCENT PROCEDURES
7-8.1 Emergency Free-Ascent Procedures
7-8.2 Ascent From Under a Vessel
7-8.3 Decompression
7-8.4 Surfacing and Leaving the Water
7-9 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES

8 SURFACE SUPPLIED AIR DIVING OPERATIONS
8-1 INTRODUCTION
8-1.1 Purpose
8-1.2 Scope
8-2 MK 21 MOD 1
8-2.1 Operation and Maintenance
8-2.2 Air Supply
8-2.2.1 Emergency Gas Supply Requirements
8-2.2.2 Flow Requirements
8-2.2.3 Pressure Requirements
8-3 MK 20 MOD 0
8-3.1 Operation and Maintenance
8-3.2 Air Supply
8-3.2.1 EGS Requirements for MK 20 MOD 0 Enclosed-Space Diving
8-3.2.2 EGS Requirements for MK 20 MOD 0 Open Water Diving
8-3.2.3 Flow Requirements
8-4 EXO BR MS
8-4.1 EXO BR MS
8-4.2 Operations and Maintenance
8-4.3 Air Supply
8-4.4 EGS Requirements for EXO BR MS
8-4.5 Flow and Pressure Requirements
8-5 PORTABLE SURFACE-SUPPLIED DIVING SYSTEMS
8-5.1 MK 3 MOD 0 Lightweight Dive System (LWDS)
8-5.1.1 MK 3 MOD 0 Configuration 1
8-5.1.2 MK 3 MOD 0 Configuration 2
8-5.1.3 MK 3 MOD 0 Configuration 3
8-5.2 MK 3 MOD 1 Lightweight Dive System
8-5.3 ROPER Diving Cart
8-5.4 Flyaway Dive System (FADS) I
8-5.5 Flyaway Dive System (FADS) II
8-5.6 Flyaway Dive System (FADS) III
8-6 ACCESSORY EQUIPMENT FOR SURFACE-SUPPLIED DIVING
8-7 SURFACE AIR SUPPLY SYSTEMS
8-7.1 Requirements for Air Supply
8-7.1.1 Air Purity Standards
8-7.1.2 Air Supply Flow Requirements
8-7.1.3 Supply Pressure Requirements
8-7.1.4 Water Vapor Control
8-7.1.5 Standby Diver Air Requirements
8-7.2 Primary and Secondary Air Supply
8-7.2.1 Requirements for Operating Procedures and Emergency Procedures
8-7.2.2 Air Compressors
8-7.2.3 High-Pressure Air Cylinders and Flasks
8-7.2.4 Shipboard Air Systems
8-8 DIVER COMMUNICATIONS
8-8.1 Diver Intercommunication Systems
8-8.2 Line-Pull Signals
8-9 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
8-9.1 Predive Checklist
8-9.2 Diving Station Preparation
8-9.3 Air Supply Preparation
8-9.4 Line Preparation
8-9.5 Recompression Chamber Inspection and Preparation
8-9.6 Predive Inspection
8-9.7 Donning Gear
8-9.8 Diving Supervisor Predive Checklist
8-10 WATER ENTRY AND DESCENT
8-10.1 Predescent Surface Check
8-10.2 Descent
8-11 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
8-11.1 Adapting to Underwater Conditions
8-11.2 Movement on the Bottom
8-11.3 Searching on the Bottom
8-11.4 Enclosed Space Diving
8-11.4.1 Enclosed Space Hazards
8-11.4.2 Enclosed Space Safety Precautions
8-11.5 Working Around Corners
8-11.6 Working Inside a Wreck
8-11.7 Working With or Near Lines or Moorings
8-11.8 Bottom Checks
8-11.9 Job Site Procedures
8-11.9.1 Underwater Ship Husbandry Procedures
8-11.9.2 Working with Tools
8-11.10 Safety Procedures
8-11.10.1 Fouled Umbilical Lines
8-11.10.2 Fouled Descent Lines
8-11.10.3 Falling
8-11.10.4 Damage to Helmet and Diving Dress
8-11.11 Tending the Diver
8-11.12 Monitoring the Diver’s Movements
8-12 ASCENT PROCEDURES
8-13 SURFACE DECOMPRESSION
8-13.1 Disadvantages of In-Water Decompression
8-13.2 Transferring a Diver to the Chamber
8-14 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES
8-14.1 Personnel and Reporting
8-14.2 Equipment

9 AIR DECOMPRESSION
9-1 INTRODUCTION
9-1.1 Purpose
9-1.2 Scope
9-2 THEORY OF DECOMPRESSION
9-3 AIR DECOMPRESSION DEFINITIONS
9-3.1 Descent Time
9-3.2 Bottom Time
9-3.3 Decompression Table
9-3.4 Decompression Schedule
9-3.5 Decompression Stop
9-3.6 Depth
9-3.7 Equivalent Single Dive Bottom Time
9-3.8 Unlimited/No-Decompression (No “D”) Limit
9-3.9 Repetitive Dive
9-3.10 Repetitive Group Designation
9-3.11 Residual Nitrogen
9-3.12 Residual Nitrogen Time
9-3.13 Single Dive
9-3.14 Single Repetitive Dive
9-3.15 Surface Interval
9-4 DIVE RECORDING
9-5 TABLE SELECTION
9-5.1 Decompression Tables Available
9-5.2 Selection of Decompression Schedule
9-6 ASCENT PROCEDURES
9-6.1 Rules During Ascent
9-6.1.1 Ascent Rate
9-6.1.2 Decompression Stop Time
9-6.2 Variations in Rate of Ascent
9-6.2.1 Delays in Arriving at the First Stop
9-6.2.2 Travel Rate Exceeded
9-6.3 Asymptomatic Omitted Decompression
9-6.3.1 Planned and Unplanned Omitted Decompression
9-6.3.2 Treating Omitted Decompression with Symptoms
9-6.3.3 Treating Omitted Decompression in Specific Operational
Environments
9-6.3.4 Ascent from 20 Feet or Shallower (Shallow Surfacing) with
Decompression Stops Required
9-6.3.5 Ascent from 20 Feet or Shallower with No Decompression
Stops Required
9-6.3.6 Ascent from Deeper than 20 Feet (Uncontrolled Ascent)
9-6.3.7 Asymptomatic Uncontrolled Ascent
9-6.3.8 Development of Symptoms
9-7 UNLIMITED/NO-DECOMPRESSION LIMITS AND REPETITIVE GROUP DESIGNATION TABLE FOR UNLIMITED/NO-DECOMPRESSION AIR DIVES
9-7.1 Example
9-7.2 Solution
9-8 U.S. NAVY STANDARD AIR DECOMPRESSION TABLE
9-8.1 Example
9-8.2 Solution
9-9 REPETITIVE DIVES
9-9.1 Residual Nitrogen Timetable for Repetitive Air Dives
9-9.1.1 Example
9-9.1.2 RNT Exception Rule
9-10 SURFACE DECOMPRESSION
9-10.1 Surface Decompression Table Using Oxygen
9-10.1.1 Example
9-10.1.2 Loss of Oxygen Supply in the Chamber (40 fsw Chamber Stop)
9-10.1.3 CNS Oxygen Toxicity (40 fsw Chamber Stop)
9-10.1.4 Repetitive Dives
9-10.2 Surface Decompression Table Using Air
9-10.2.1 Example
9-10.2.2 Solution
9-10.2.3 Repetitive Dives
9-11 EXCEPTIONAL EXPOSURE DIVES
9-11.1 Surface Decompression Procedures for Exceptional Exposure Dives
9-11.1.1 If oxygen is available at the 30 fsw stop in the water:
9-11.1.2 If no oxygen is available at the 30 fsw stop in the water:
9-11.2 Oxygen System Failure (Chamber Stop)
9-12 DIVING AT HIGH ALTITUDES
9-12.1 Altitude Correction Procedure
9-12.1.1 Correction of Depth of Dive
9-12.1.2 Correction for Decompression Stop Depths
9-12.2 Need for Correction
9-12.3 Depth Measurement at Altitude
9-12.4 Equilibration at Altitude
9-12.5 Diving At Altitude Worksheet
9-12.5.1 Corrections for Depth of Dive at Altitude and In-Water Stops
9-12.5.2 Corrections for Equilibration
9-12.6 Repetitive Dives
9-13 ASCENT TO ALTITUDE AFTER DIVING/FLYING AFTER DIVING

10 NITROGEN-OXYGEN DIVING OPERATIONS
10-1 INTRODUCTION
10-1.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of NITROX Diving
10-2 EQUIVALENT AIR DEPTH
10-2.1 Equivalent Air Depth Calculation
10-3 OXYGEN TOXICITY
10-3.1 Selecting the Proper NITROX Mixture
10-4 NITROX DIVING PROCEDURES
10-4.1 NITROX Diving Using Equivalent Air Depths
10-4.2 SCUBA Operations
10-4.3 Special Procedures
10-4.4 Omitted Decompression
10-4.5 Dives Exceeding the Normal Working Limit
10-5 NITROX REPETITIVE DIVING
10-6 NITROX DIVE CHARTING
10-7 FLEET TRAINING FOR NITROX
10-8 NITROX DIVING EQUIPMENT
10-8.1 Open-Circuit SCUBA Systems
10-8.1.1 Regulators
10-8.1.2 Bottles
10-8.2 General
10-8.3 Surface-Supplied NITROX Diving
10-9 EQUIPMENT CLEANLINESS
10-10 BREATHING GAS PURITY
10-11 NITROX MIXING
10-12 NITROX MIXING, BLENDING, AND STORAGE SYSTEMS

11 ICE AND COLD WATER DIVING OPERATIONS
11-1 INTRODUCTION
11-1.1 Purpose
11-1.2 Scope
11-2 OPERATIONS PLANNING
11-2.1 Planning Guidelines
11-2.2 Navigational Considerations
11-2.3 Scuba Considerations
11-2.4 Scuba Regulators
11-2.4.1 Special Precautions
11-2.4.2 Octopus and Redundant Regulators
11-2.5 Life Preserver
11-2.6 Face Mask
11-2.7 Scuba Equipment
11-2.8 Surface-Supplied Diving System (SSDS) Considerations
11-2.8.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of SSDS
11-2.8.2 Effect of Ice Conditions on SSDS
11-2.9 Suit Selection
11-2.9.1 Wet Suits
11-2.9.2 Variable Volume Dry Suits
11-2.9.3 Extreme Exposure Suits/Hot Water Suits
11-2.10 Clothing
11-2.11 Ancillary Equipment
11-2.12 Dive Site Shelter
11-3 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
11-3.1 Personnel Considerations
11-3.2 Dive Site Selection Considerations
11-3.3 Shelter
11-3.4 Entry Hole
11-3.5 Escape Holes
11-3.6 Navigation Lines
11-3.7 Lifelines
11-3.8 Equipment Preparation
11-4 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
11-4.1 Buddy Diving
11-4.2 Tending the Diver
11-4.3 Standby Diver
11-5 OPERATING PRECAUTIONS
11-5.1 General Precautions
11-5.2 Ice Conditions
11-5.3 Dressing Precautions
11-5.4 On-Surface Precautions
11-5.5 In-Water Precautions
11-5.6 Postdive Precautions
11-6 EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
11-6.1 Lost Diver
11-6.2 Searching for a Lost Diver
11-6.3 Hypothermia
11-7 ADDITIONAL REFERENCES



VOLUME 3

12 MIXED-GAS DIVING THEORY
12-1 INTRODUCTION
12-1.1 Purpose
12-1.2 Scope
12-2 BOYLE’S LAW
12-3 CHARLES’/GAY-LUSSAC’S LAW
12-4 THE GENERAL GAS LAW
12-5 DALTON’S LAW
12-6 HENRY’S LAW

13 MIXED GAS OPERATIONAL PLANNING
13-1 INTRODUCTION
13-1.1 Purpose
13-1.2 Scope
13-1.3 Additional Sources of Information
13-1.4 Complexity of Mixed Gas Diving
13-1.5 Medical Considerations
13-2 ESTABLISH OPERATIONAL TASKS
13-3 SELECT DIVING METHOD AND EQUIPMENT
13-3.1 Mixed Gas Diving Methods
13-3.2 Method Considerations
13-3.3 Depth
13-3.4 Bottom Time Requirements
13-3.5 Environment
13-3.6 Mobility
13-3.7 Equipment Selection
13-3.8 Operational Characteristics
13-3.9 Support Equipment and ROVs
13-3.9.1 Types of ROV
13-3.9.2 ROV Capabilities
13-3.10 Diver’s Breathing Gas Requirements
13-3.10.1 Gas Consumption Rates
13-3.10.2 Surface Supplied Diving Requirements
13-3.10.3 Deep Diving System Requirements
13-4 SELECTING AND ASSEMBLING THE DIVE TEAM
13-4.1 Diver Training
13-4.2 Personnel Requirements
13-4.3 Diver Fatigue
13-5 BRIEFING THE DIVE TEAM
13-6 FINAL PREPARATIONS AND SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
13-7 RECORD KEEPING
13-8 MIXED GAS DIVING EQUIPMENT
13-8.1 Minimum Required Equipment
13-8.2 MK 21 MOD 1 and EXO BR MS Surface Supplied Helium-Oxygen Description
13-8.3 Flyaway Dive System III Mixed Gas System (FMGS)

14 SURFACE SUPPLIED MIXED-GAS DIVING PROCEDURES
14-1 INTRODUCTION
14-1.1 Purpose
14-1.2 Scope
14-2 PLANNING THE OPERATION
14-2.1 Depth and Exposure Limits
14-2.2 Ascent to Altitude
14-2.3 Water Temperature
14-2.4 Gas Mixtures
14-2.5 Emergency Gas Supply
14-3 SURFACE SUPPLIED HELIUM OXYGEN DESCENT AND ASCENT PROCEDURES
14-3.1 Selecting the Bottom Mix
14-3.2 Selecting the Decompression Schedule
14-3.3 Travel Rates
14-3.4 Decompression Breathing Gases
14-3.5 Special Procedures for Descent with Less than 16 Percent Oxygen
14-3.6 Aborting Dive During Descent
14-3.7 Procedures for Shifting to 50 Percent Helium/50 Percent Oxygen at 90 fsw
14-3.8 Procedures for Shifting to 100 Percent Oxygen at 30 fsw
14-3.9 30 fsw and 20 fsw Water Stops
14-3.10 Ascent from the 20 fsw Water Stop
14-3.11 Surface Decompression Procedures (SUR D)
14-3.12 Variation in Rate of Ascent
14-3.12.1 Early arrival at the first stop:
14-3.12.2 Delays in Arriving at the First Stop
14-3.12.3 Delays in Leaving a Stop or Arrival at the Next Stop
14-3.12.4 Delays in Travel from 40 fsw to the Surface for Surface
Decompression
14-4 SURFACE SUPPLIED HELIUM OXYGEN EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
14-4.1 Bottom Time in Excess of the Table
14-4.2 Loss of Helium Oxygen Supply on the Bottom
14-4.3 Loss of 50 Percent Oxygen Supply During In-Water Decompression
14-4.4 Loss of Oxygen Supply During In-Water Decompression
14-4.5 Loss of Oxygen Supply in the Chamber During Surface Decompression
14-4.6 Decompression Gas Supply Contamination
14-4.7 CNS Oxygen Toxicity Symptoms (Nonconvulsive) at the 90-60 fsw Water Stops
14-4.8 Oxygen Convulsion at the 90-60 fsw Water Stop
14-4.9 CNS Oxygen Toxicity Symptoms (Nonconvulsive) at 50 and 40 fsw Water Stops
14-4.10 Oxygen Convulsion at the 50 and 40 fsw Water Stop
14-4.11 CNS Oxygen Toxicity Symptoms (Nonconvulsive) at 30 and 20 fsw Water Stops
14-4.12 Oxygen Convulsion at the 30 and 20 fsw Water Stop
14-4.13 Oxygen Toxicity Symptoms in the Chamber
14-4.14 Asymptomatic Omitted Decompression
14-4.14.1 Omitted Decompression from a Depth Greater Than 50 fsw
14-4.15 Symptomatic Omitted Decompression
14-4.16 Light Headed or Dizzy Diver on the Bottom
14-4.16.1 Initial Management
14-4.16.2 Vertigo
14-4.17 Unconscious Diver on the Bottom
14-4.18 Decompression Sickness in the Water
14-4.18.1 Decompression Sickness Deeper than 30 fsw
14-4.18.2 Decompression Sickness at 30 fsw and Shallower
14-4.19 Decompression Sickness During the Surface Interval
14-5 CHARTING SURFACE SUPPLIED HELIUM OXYGEN DIVES
14-5.1 Charting an HeO2Dive

15 SATURATION DIVING
15-1 INTRODUCTION
15-1.1 Purpose
15-1.2 Scope
15-2 APPLICATIONS
15-3 BASIC COMPONENTS OF A SATURATION DIVE SYSTEM
15-3.1 Personnel Transfer Capsule
15-3.1.1 Gas Supplies
15-3.1.2 PTC Pressurization/Depressurization System
15-3.1.3 PTC Life-Support System
15-3.1.4 Electrical System
15-3.1.5 Communications System
15-3.1.6 Strength, Power, and Communications Cables (SPCCs).
15-3.1.7 PTC Main Umbilical
15-3.1.8 Diver Hot Water System
15-3.2 Deck Decompression Chamber (DDC)
15-3.2.1 DDC Life-Support System (LSS)
15-3.2.2 Sanitary System
15-3.2.3 Fire Suppression System
15-3.2.4 Main Control Console (MCC)
15-3.2.5 Gas Supply Mixing and Storage
15-3.3 PTC Handling Systems
15-3.3.1 Handling System Characteristics
15-3.4 Saturation Mixed-Gas Diving Equipment
15-4 U.S. NAVY SATURATION FACILITIES
15-4.1 Navy Experimental Diving Unit (NEDU), Panama City, FL
15-4.2 Naval Submarine Medical Research Laboratory (NSMRL), New London, CT
15-5 INTRODUCTION
15-6 THERMAL PROTECTION SYSTEM
15-6.1 Diver Heating
15-6.2 Inspired Gas Heating
15-7 SATURATION DIVING UNDERWATER BREATHING APPARATUS
15-8 UBA GAS USAGE
15-8.1 Specific Dives
15-8.2 Emergency Gas Supply Duration
15-8.3 Gas Composition
15-9 INTRODUCTION
15-10 OPERATIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
15-10.1 Dive Team Selection
15-10.2 Mission Training
15-11 SELECTION OF STORAGE DEPTH
15-12 RECORDS
15-12.1 Command Diving Log
15-12.2 Master Protocol
15-12.2.1 Modifications
15-12.2.2 Elements
15-12.3 Chamber Atmosphere Data Sheet
15-12.4 Service Lock
15-12.5 Machinery Log/Gas Status Report
15-12.6 Operational Procedures (OPs)
15-12.7 Emergency Procedures (EPs)
15-12.8 Individual Dive Record
15-13 LOGISTICS
15-14 DDC AND PTC ATMOSPHERE CONTROL
15-15 GAS SUPPLY REQUIREMENTS
15-15.1 UBA Gas
15-15.2 Emergency Gas
15-15.3 Treatment Gases
15-16 ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROL
15-17 FIRE ZONE CONSIDERATIONS
15-18 HYGIENE
15-18.1 Personal Hygiene
15-18.2 Prevention of External Ear Infections
15-18.3 Chamber Cleanliness
15-18.4 Food Preparation and Handling
15-19 ATMOSPHERE QUALITY CONTROL
15-19.1 Gaseous Contaminants
15-19.2 Initial Unmanned Screening Procedures.
15-20 COMPRESSION PHASE
15-20.1 Establishing Chamber Oxygen Partial Pressure
15-20.2 Compression to Storage Depth
15-20.3 Precautions During Compression
15-20.4 Abort Procedures During Compression
15-21 STORAGE DEPTH
15-21.1 Excursion Table Examples
15-21.2 PTC Diving Procedures
15-21.2.1 PTC Deployment Procedures
15-22 DEEP DIVING SYSTEM (DDS) EMERGENCY PROCEDURES
15-22.1 Loss of Chamber Atmosphere Control
15-22.1.1 Loss of Oxygen Control
15-22.1.2 Loss of Carbon Dioxide Control
15-22.1.3 Atmosphere Contamination
15-22.1.4 Interpretation of the Analysis
15-22.1.5 Loss of Temperature Control
15-22.2 Loss of Depth Control
15-22.3 Fire in the DDC.
15-22.4 PTC Emergencies
15-23 SATURATION DECOMPRESSION
15-23.1 Upward Excursion Depth
15-23.2 Travel Rate
15-23.3 Post-Excursion Hold
15-23.4 Rest Stops
15-23.5 Saturation Decompression Rates
15-23.6 Atmosphere Control at Shallow Depths
15-23.7 Saturation Dive Mission Abort
15-23.7.1 Emergency Cases
15-23.7.2 Emergency Abort Procedure
15-23.8 Decompression Sickness (DCS)
15-23.8.1 Type I Decompression Sickness
15-23.8.2 Type II Decompressions Sickness
15-24 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES

16 BREATHING GAS MIXING PROCEDURES
16-1 INTRODUCTION
16-1.1 Purpose
16-1.2 Scope
16-2 MIXING PROCEDURES
16-2.1 Mixing by Partial Pressure
16-2.2 Ideal-Gas Method Mixing Procedure
16-2.3 Adjustment of Oxygen Percentage
16-2.3.1 Increasing the Oxygen Percentage
16-2.3.2 Reducing the Oxygen Percentage
16-2.4 Continuous-Flow Mixing
16-2.5 Mixing by Volume
16-2.6 Mixing by Weight
16-3 GAS ANALYSIS
16-3.1 Instrument Selection
16-3.2 Techniques for Analyzing Constituents of a Gas



VOLUME 4

17 CLOSED-CIRCUIT MIXED-GAS UBA DIVING
17-1 INTRODUCTION
17-1.1 Purpose
17-1.2 Scope
17-2 PRINCIPLES OF OPERATION
17-2.1 Diving Safety
17-2.2 Advantages of Closed-Circuit Mixed-Gas UBA
17-2.3 Recirculation and Carbon Dioxide Removal
17-2.3.1 Recirculating Gas
17-2.3.2 Full Face Mask
17-2.3.3 Carbon Dioxide Scrubber
17-2.3.4 Diaphragm Assembly
17-2.3.5 Recirculation System
17-3 MK16 MOD 0 Closed Circuit UBA
17-3.1 Housing System
17-3.2 Recirculation System
17-3.2.1 Closed-Circuit Subassembly
17-3.2.2 Scrubber Functions
17-3.3 Pneumatics System
17-3.4 Electronics System
17-3.4.1 Oxygen Sensing
17-3.4.2 Oxygen Control
17-3.4.3 Displays
17-4 OPERATIONAL PLANNING
17-4.1 Operating Limitations
17-4.1.1 Oxygen Flask Endurance
17-4.1.2 Diluent Flask Endurance
17-4.1.3 Canister Duration
17-4.1.4 Thermal Protection
17-4.2 Equipment Requirements
17-4.2.1 Distance Line
17-4.2.2 Standby Diver
17-4.2.3 Lines
17-4.2.4 Marking of Lines
17-4.2.5 Diver Marker Buoy
17-4.2.6 Depth Gauge/Wrist Watch
17-4.3 Recompression Chamber Considerations
17-4.4 Ship Safety
17-4.5 Operational Area Clearance
17-5 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
17-5.1 Diving Supervisor Brief
17-5.2 Diving Supervisor Check
17-6 WATER ENTRY AND DESCENT
17-7 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
17-7.1 General Guidelines
17-7.2 At Depth
17-8 ASCENT PROCEDURES
17-9 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES
17-10 DECOMPRESSION PROCEDURES
17-10.1 Navy Dive Computer
17-10.2 Use of Constant ppO2 Decompression Tables
17-10.3 Combat Swimmer Multilevel Dive Tables
17-10.4 Monitoring ppO2
17-10.4.1 Rules for Using 0.7 ata Constant ppO2 in Nitrogen and in Helium
Decompression Tables
17-10.4.2 PPO2 Variances
17-10.5 MK16 MOD 0 Decompression Dives
17-10.5.1 Emergency Breathing System (EBS)
17-10.5.2 Asymptomatic Omitted Decompression
17-10.5.3 Symptomatic Omitted Decompression
17-11 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CLOSED-CIRCUIT MIXED-GAS UBA
17-11.1 Central Nervous System (CNS) Oxygen Toxicity
17-11.1.1 Causes of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
17-11.1.2 Symptoms of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
17-11.1.3 Treating CNS Oxygen Toxicity Convulsions
17-11.1.4 Treatment of Underwater Convulsion
17-11.1.5 Prevention of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
17-11.1.6 Off-Effect
17-11.2 Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity
17-11.3 Oxygen Deficiency (Hypoxia)
17-11.3.1 Causes of Hypoxia
17-11.3.2 Symptoms of Hypoxia
17-11.3.3 Treating Hypoxia
17-11.3.4 Treatment of Hypoxic Divers Requiring Decompression
17-11.4 Carbon Dioxide Toxicity (Hypercapnia)
17-11.4.1 Causes of Hypercapnia
17-11.4.2 Symptoms of Hypercapnia
17-11.4.3 Treating Hypercapnia
17-11.4.4 Prevention of Hypercapnia
17-11.5 Chemical Injury
17-11.5.1 Causes of Chemical Injury
17-11.5.2 Symptoms of Chemical Injury
17-11.5.3 Management of a Chemical Incident
17-11.5.4 Prevention of Chemical Injury
17-11.6 Decompression Sickness in the Water
17-11.6.1 Diver Remaining in Water
17-11.6.2 Diver Leaving the Water
17-12 MK 16 DIVING EQUIPMENT REFERENCE DATA

18 MK 16 MOD 1 CLOSED-CIRCUIT MIXED-GAS UBA
18-1 INTRODUCTION
18-1.1 Purpose
18-1.2 Scope
18-2 OPERATIONAL PLANNING
18-2.1 Operating Limitations
18-2.1.1 Oxygen Flask Endurance
18-2.1.2 Effect of Cold Water Immersion on Flask Pressure
18-2.1.3 Diluent Flask Endurance
18-2.1.4 Canister Duration
18-2.2 Equipment Requirements
18-2.2.1 Safety Boat
18-2.2.2 Buddy Lines
18-2.2.3 Distance Line
18-2.2.4 Standby Diver
18-2.2.5 Tending Lines
18-2.2.6 Marking of Lines
18-2.2.7 Diver Marker Buoy
18-2.2.8 Depth Gauge/Wrist Watch
18-2.2.9 Thermal Protection.
18-2.2.10Approved Life Preserver or Buoyancy Control Device (BCD)
18-2.2.11 Full Face Mask (FFM)
18-2.2.12 Emergency Breathing System (EBS)
18-2.3 Recompression Chamber Considerations
18-2.4 Diving Procedures for MK 16 MOD 1
18-2.4.1 EOD Standard Safety Procedures
18-2.4.2 Diving Methods
18-2.5 Ship Safety
18-2.6 Operational Area Clearance.
18-3 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
18-3.1 Diving Supervisor Brief
18-3.2 Diving Supervisor Check
18-4 DESCENT
18-5 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
18-5.1 General Guidelines
18-5.2 At Depth
18-6 ASCENT PROCEDURES
18-7 DECOMPRESSION PROCEDURES
18-7.1 Monitoring ppO2
18-7.2 Rules for Using MK 16 MOD 1 Decompression Tables
18-7.3 PPO2 Variances
18-7.4 Emergency Breathing System (EBS)
18-7.4.1 EBS Deployment Procedures
18-8 FLYING AFTER DIVING AND ALTITUDE DIVING PROCEDURES
18-9 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES
18-10 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CLOSED-CIRCUIT MIXED-GAS UBA
18-10.1 Central Nervous System (CNS) Oxygen Toxicity
18-10.1.1 Causes of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
18-10.1.2 Symptoms of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
18-10.1.3 Treatment of Nonconvulsive Symptoms
18-10.1.4 Treatment of Underwater Convulsion
18-10.1.5 Prevention of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
18-10.1.6 Off-Effect
18-10.2 Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity
18-10.3 Oxygen Deficiency (Hypoxia)
18-10.3.1 Causes of Hypoxia
18-10.3.2 Symptoms of Hypoxia
18-10.3.3 Treating Hypoxia
18-10.3.4 Treatment of Hypoxic Divers Requiring Decompression
18-10.4 Carbon Dioxide Toxicity (Hypercapnia)
18-10.4.1 Causes of Hypercapnia
18-10.4.2 Symptoms of Hypercapnia
18-10.4.3 Treating Hypercapnia
18-10.4.4 Prevention of Hypercapnia
18-10.5 Chemical Injury.
18-10.5.1 Causes of Chemical Injury
18-10.5.2 Symptoms of Chemical Injury
18-10.5.3 Management of a Chemical Incident
18-10.5.4 Prevention of Chemical Injury
18-10.6 Omitted Decompression
18-10.6.1 At 20 fsw
18-10.6.2 Deeper than 20 fsw
18-10.6.3 Deeper than 20 fsw/No Recompression Chamber Available
18-10.6.4 Evidence of Decompression Sickness or Arterial Gas Embolism
18-10.7 Decompression Sickness in the Water
18-10.7.1 Diver Remaining in Water
18-10.7.2 Diver Leaving the Water
18-11 MK 16 MOD 1 DIVING EQUIPMENT REFERENCE DATA

19 CLOSED-CIRCUIT OXYGEN UBA DIVING
19-1 INTRODUCTION
19-1.1 Purpose
19-1.2 Scope
19-2 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CLOSED-CIRCUIT OXYGEN DIVING
19-2.1 Central Nervous System (CNS) Oxygen Toxicity
19-2.1.1 Causes of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
19-2.1.2 Symptoms of CNS Oxygen Toxicity
19-2.1.3 Treatment of Nonconvulsive Symptoms
19-2.1.4 Treatment of Underwater Convulsion
19-2.1.5 Off-Effect
19-2.2 Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity
19-2.3 Oxygen Deficiency (Hypoxia).
19-2.3.1 Causes of Hypoxia with the MK 25 UBA
19-2.3.2 MK 25 UBA Purge Procedure
19-2.3.3 Underwater Purge
19-2.3.4 Symptoms of Hypoxia
19-2.3.5 Treatment of Hypoxia
19-2.4 Carbon Dioxide Toxicity (Hypercapnia)
19-2.4.1 Symptoms of Hypercapnia
19-2.4.2 Treating Hypercapnia
19-2.4.3 Prevention of Hypercapnia
19-2.5 Chemical Injury
19-2.5.1 Causes of Chemical Injury
19-2.5.2 Symptoms of Chemical Injury
19-2.5.3 Treatment of a Chemical Incident
19-2.5.4 Prevention of Chemical Injury
19-2.6 Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome.
19-2.6.1 Causes of Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
19-2.6.2 Symptoms of Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
19-2.6.3 Treating Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
19-2.6.4 Prevention of Middle Ear Oxygen Absorption Syndrome
19-3 MK-25
19-3.1 Gas Flow Path
19-3.1.1 Breathing Loop
19-3.2 Operational Duration of the MK 25 UBA
19-3.2.1 Oxygen Supply
19-3.2.2 Canister Duration.
19-3.3 Packing Precautions
19-3.4 Preventing Caustic Solutions in the Canister
19-4 CLOSED-CIRCUIT OXYGEN EXPOSURE LIMITS
19-4.1 Transit with Excursion Limits Table
19-4.2 Single-Depth Oxygen Exposure Limits Table
19-4.3 Oxygen Exposure Limit Testing
19-4.4 Individual Oxygen Susceptibility Precautions
19-4.5 Transit with Excursion Limits.
19-4.5.1 Transit with Excursion Limits Definitions
19-4.5.2 Transit with Excursion Rules
19-4.5.3 Inadvertent Excursions
19-4.6 Single-Depth Limits
19-4.6.1 Single-Depth Limits Definitions
19-4.6.2 Depth/Time Limits
19-4.7 Exposure Limits for Successive Oxygen Dives
19-4.7.1 Definitions for Successive Oxygen Dives
19-4.7.2 Off-Oxygen Exposure Limit Adjustments
19-4.8 Exposure Limits for Oxygen Dives Following Mixed-Gas or Air Dives
19-4.8.1 Mixed-Gas to Oxygen Rule
19-4.8.2 Oxygen to Mixed-Gas Rule
19-4.9 Oxygen Diving at High Elevations
19-4.10 Flying After Oxygen Diving
19-4.11 Combat Operations
19-5 OPERATIONS PLANNING
19-5.1 Operating Limitations
19-5.2 Maximizing Operational Range
19-5.3 Training
19-5.4 Personnel Requirements
19-5.5 Equipment Requirements
19-5.6 Predive Precautions
19-6 PREDIVE PROCEDURES
19-6.1 Equipment Preparation
19-6.2 Diving Supervisor Brief
19-6.3 Diving Supervisor Check
19-6.3.1 First Phase
19-6.3.2 Second Phase
19-7 WATER ENTRY AND DESCENT
19-7.1 Purge Procedure
19-7.2 Avoiding Purge Procedure Errors
19-8 UNDERWATER PROCEDURES
19-8.1 General Guidelines
19-8.2 UBA Malfunction Procedures19-25
19-9 ASCENT PROCEDURES
19-10 POSTDIVE PROCEDURES AND DIVE DOCUMENTATION



VOLUME 5

20 DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS AND ARTERIAL GAS EMBOLISM
20-1 INTRODUCTION
20-1.1 Purpose
20-1.2 Scope
20-1.3 Diving Supervisor’s Responsibilities
20-1.4 Prescribing and Modifying Treatments
20-1.5 When Treatment is Not Necessary
20-1.6 Emergency Consultation
20-2 ARTERIAL GAS EMBOLISM
20-2.1 Diagnosis of Arterial Gas Embolism
20-2.1.1 Symptoms of AGE
20-2.2 Treating Arterial Gas Embolism
20-2.3 Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) in an Embolized Diver
20-3 DECOMPRESSION SICKNESS
20-3.1 Diagnosis of Decompression Sickness
20-3.2 Symptoms of Type I Decompression Sickness
20-3.2.1 Musculoskeletal Pain-Only Symptoms
20-3.2.2 Cutaneous (Skin) Symptoms
20-3.2.3 Lymphatic Symptoms
20-3.3 Treatment of Type I Decompression Sickness
20-3.4 Symptoms of Type II Decompression Sickness
20-3.4.1 Neurological Symptoms
20-3.4.2 Inner Ear Symptoms (“Staggers”)
20-3.4.3 Cardiopulmonary Symptoms (“Chokes”)
20-3.4.4 Differentiating Between Type II DCS and AGE
20-3.5 Treatment of Type II Decompression Sickness
20-3.6 Symptoms During Decompression and Surface Decompression
20-3.6.1 Treatment During Surface-Supplied HeO2 and MK 16 Operations
20-3.6.2 Treatment of Symptoms During Sur-D Surface Interval
20-3.6.3 Treating for Exceeded Sur-D Surface Interval
20-3.7 Symptomatic Omitted Decompression
20-3.8 Altitude Decompression Sickness
20-3.8.1 Joint Pain Treatment
20-3.8.2 Other Symptoms and Persistent Symptoms.
20-4 RECOMPRESSION TREATMENT FOR DIVING DISORDERS
20-4.1 Primary Objectives
20-4.2 Guidance on Recompression Treatment
20-4.3 Recompression Treatment When Chamber Is Available
20-4.3.1 Recompression Treatment With Oxygen
20-4.3.2 Recompression Treatments When Oxygen Is Not Available
20-4.4 Recompression Treatment When No Recompression Chamber is Available
20-4.4.1 Transporting the Patient
20-4.4.2 In-Water Recompression
20-5 TREATMENT TABLES
20-5.1 Air Treatment Tables
20-5.2 Treatment Table 5
20-5.3 Treatment Table 6
20-5.4 Treatment Table 6A
20-5.5 Treatment Table 4
20-5.6 Treatment Table 7
20-5.6.1 Tender Decompression
20-5.6.2 Preventing Inadvertent Early Surfacing
20-5.6.3 Time Intervals
20-5.6.4 Oxygen Breathing
20-5.6.5 Sleeping, Resting, and Eating.
20-5.6.6 Ancillary Care
20-5.6.7 Life Support
20-5.6.8 Abort Procedures
20-5.7 Treatment Table 8
20-5.8 Treatment Table 9
20-6 RECOMPRESSION TREATMENT FOR NON-DIVING DISORDERS
20-7 RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER LIFE-SUPPORT CONSIDERATIONS
20-7.1 Minimum Manning Requirements
20-7.2 Optimum Manning Requirements
20-7.2.1 Additional Personnel
20-7.2.2 Required Consultation by a Diving Medical Officer
20-7.3 Oxygen Control
20-7.4 Carbon Dioxide Control
20-7.4.1 Carbon Dioxide Monitoring
20-7.4.2 Carbon Dioxide Scrubbing
20-7.4.3 Carbon Dioxide Absorbent
20-7.5 Temperature Control
20-7.5.1 Patient Hydration
20-7.6 Chamber Ventilation
20-7.7 Access to Chamber Occupants
20-7.8 Inside Tenders
20-7.8.1 Inside Tender Responsibilities
20-7.8.2 DMO or DMT Inside Tender
20-7.8.3 Use of Diving Medical Officer as Inside Tender
20-7.8.4 Non-Diver Inside Tender - Medical
20-7.8.5 Specialized Medical Care
20-7.8.6 Inside Tender Oxygen Breathing
20-7.8.7 Tending Frequency
20-7.9 Equalizing During Descent
20-7.10 Use of High Oxygen Mixes
20-7.11 Oxygen Toxicity During Treatment
20-7.11.1 Central Nervous System Oxygen Toxicity
20-7.11.2 Pulmonary Oxygen Toxicity
20-7.12 Loss of Oxygen During Treatment
20-7.12.1 Compensation
20-7.12.2 Switching to Air Treatment Table
20-7.13 Treatment at Altitude - Tender Considerations
20-8 POST-TREATMENT CONSIDERATIONS
20-8.1 Post-Treatment Observation Period
20-8.2 Post-Treatment Transfer
20-8.3 Flying After Treatments
20-8.3.1 Emergency Air Evacuation
20-8.4 Treatment of Residual Symptoms
20-8.5 Returning to Diving after Recompression Treatment
20-9 NON-STANDARD TREATMENTS
20-10 RECOMPRESSION TREATMENT ABORT PROCEDURES
20-10.1 Death During Treatment
20-10.2 Oxygen Breathing Periods During Abort Procedure
20-10.3 Impending Natural Disasters or Mechanical Failures
20-11 ANCILLARY CARE AND ADJUNCTIVE TREATMENTS
20-11.1Decompression Sickness
20-11.1.1 Surface Oxygen
20-11.1.2 Fluids
20-11.1.3 Anticoagulants
20-11.1.4 Aspirin and Other Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
20-11.1.5 Steroids
20-11.1.6 Lidocaine
20-11.1.7 Chamber Temperature
20-11.2 Arterial Gas Embolism
20-11.2.1 Surface Oxygen
20-11.2.2 Lidocaine
20-11.2.3 Fluids
20-11.2.4 Anticoagulants
20-11.2.5 Aspirin and Other Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs
20-11.2.6 Steroids
20-11.3 Sleeping and Eating
20-12 EMERGENCY MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
20-12.1 Primary and Secondary Emergency Kits.
20-12.2 Portable Monitor-Defibrillator.20-34
20-12.3 Use of Emergency Kits
20-12.3.1 Modification of Emergency Kits

21 RECOMPRESSION CHAMBER OPERATION
21-1 INTRODUCTION
21-1.1 Purpose
21-1.2 Scope
21-2 DESCRIPTION
21-2.1 Basic Requirements
21-2.1.1 Chamber Volume
21-2.2 Modernized Chamber
21-2.3 Standard Navy Double Lock Recompression Chamber System (SNDLRCS)
21-2.2 Modernized Chamber
21-2.3 Standard Navy Double Lock Recompression Chamber System (SNDLRCS)
21-2.4 Transportable Recompression Chamber System (TRCS)
21-2.5 Fly Away Recompression Chamber (FARCC)
21-2.6 Emergency Evacuation Hyperbaric Stretcher (EEHS)
21-2.7 Standard Features
21-2.7.1 Labeling
21-2.7.2 Inlet and Exhaust Ports
21-2.7.3 Pressure Gauges
21-2.7.4 Relief Valves
21-2.7.5 Communications System
21-2.7.6 Lighting Fixtures
21-3 STATE OF READINESS
21-4 GAS SUPPLY
21-4.1 Capacity
21-5 OPERATION
21-5.1 Predive Checklist
21-5.2 Safety Precautions
21-5.3 General Operating Procedures
21-5.3.1 Tender Change-Out
21-5.3.2 Lock-In Operations
21-5.3.3 Lock-Out Operations
21-5.3.4 Gag Valves
21-5.4 Ventilation
21-5.4.1 Chamber Ventilation Bill
21-5.4.2 Notes on Chamber Ventilation
21-6 CHAMBER MAINTENANCE
21-6.1 Postdive Checklist
21-6.2 Scheduled Maintenance
21-6.2.1 Inspections
21-6.2.2 Corrosion
21-6.2.3 Painting Steel Chambers
21-6.2.4 Recompression Chamber Paint Process Instruction
21-6.2.5 Stainless Steel Chambers
21-6.2.6 Fire Hazard Prevention
21-7 DIVER CANDIDATE PRESSURE TEST
21-7.1 Candidate Requirements
21-7.2 Procedure
21-7.2.1 References

VOLUME 5 - Appendix

Appendix 5A NEUROLOGICAL EXAMINATION
Appendix 5A-1 INTRODUCTION
Appendix 5A-2 INITIAL ASSESSMENT OF DIVING INJURIES
Appendix 5A-3 NEUROLOGICAL ASSESSMENT
Appendix 5A-3.1 Mental Status
Appendix 5A-3.2 Coordination (Cerebellar/Inner Ear Function)
Appendix 5A-3.3 Cranial Nerves
Appendix 5A-3.4 Motor
Appendix 5A-3.4.1 Extremity Strength
Appendix 5A-3.4.2 Muscle Size
Appendix 5A-3.4.3 Muscle Tone
Appendix 5A-3.4.4 Involuntary Movements
Appendix 5A-3.5 Sensory Function
Appendix 5A-3.5.1 Sensory Examination
Appendix 5A-3.5.2 Sensations
Appendix 5A-3.5.3 Instruments
Appendix 5A-3.5.4 Testing the Trunk
Appendix 5A-3.5.5 Testing Limbs
Appendix 5A-3.5.6 Testing the Hands
Appendix 5A-3.5.7 Marking Abnormalities
Appendix 5A-3.6 Deep Tendon Reflexes
Appendix 5B FIRST AID
Appendix 5B-1 INTRODUCTION
Appendix 5B-2 CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION
Appendix 5B-3 CONTROL OF MASSIVE BLEEDING
Appendix 5B-3.1 External Arterial Hemorrhage.
Appendix 5B-3.2 Direct Pressure
Appendix 5B-3.3 Pressure Points
Appendix 5B-3.3.1 Pressure Point Location on Face
Appendix 5B-3.3.2 Pressure Point Location for Shoulder or Upper Arm
Appendix 5B-3.3.3 Pressure Point Location for Middle Arm and Hand
Appendix 5B-3.3.4 Pressure Point Location for Thigh
Appendix 5B-3.3.5 Pressure Point Location for Foot
Appendix 5B-3.3.6 Pressure Point Location for Temple or Scalp
Appendix 5B-3.3.7 Pressure Point Location for Neck
Appendix 5B-3.3.8 Pressure Point Location for Lower Arm
Appendix 5B-3.3.9 Pressure Point Location of the Upper Thigh
Appendix 5B-3.3.10 Pressure Point Location Between Knee and Foot
Appendix 5B-3.3.11 Determining Correct Pressure Point
Appendix 5B-3.3.12 When to Use Pressure Points
Appendix 5B-3.4 Tourniquet
Appendix 5B-3.4.1 How to Make a Tourniquet
Appendix 5B-3.4.2 Tightness of Tourniquet
Appendix 5B-3.4.3 After Bleeding is Under Control
Appendix 5B-3.4.4 Points to Remember
Appendix 5B-3.5 External Venous Hemorrhage
Appendix 5B-3.6 Internal Bleeding
Appendix 5B-3.6.1 Treatment of Internal Bleeding
Appendix 5B-4 SHOCK
Appendix 5B-4.1 Signs and Symptoms of Shock
Appendix 5B-4.2 Treatment
Appendix 5C DANGEROUS MARINE ANIMALS
Appendix 5C-1 INTRODUCTION
Appendix 5C-1.1 Purpose
Appendix 5C-1.2 Scope
Appendix 5C-2 PREDATORY MARINE ANIMALS
Appendix 5C-2.1 Sharks
Appendix 5C-2.1.1 Shark Pre-Attack Behavior
Appendix 5C-2.1.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-2.2 Killer Whales
Appendix 5C-2.2.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-2.2.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-2.3 Barracuda
Appendix 5C-2.3.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-2.3.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-2.4 Moray Eels
Appendix 5C-2.4.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-2.4.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-2.5 Sea Lions
Appendix 5C-2.5.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-2.5.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3 VENOMOUS MARINE ANIMALS
Appendix 5C-3.1 Venomous Fish (Excluding Stonefish, Zebrafish, Scorpionfish)
Appendix 5C-3.1.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.1.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.2 Highly Toxic Fish (Stonefish, Zebra-fish, Scorpionfish)
Appendix 5C-3.2.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.2.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.3 Stingrays
Appendix 5C-3.3.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.3.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.4 Coelenterates
Appendix 5C-3.4.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.4.2 Avoidance of Tentacles
Appendix 5C-3.4.3 Protection Against Jellyfish
Appendix 5C-3.4.4 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.4.5 Symptomatic Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.4.6 Anaphylaxis
Appendix 5C-3.4.7 Antivenin
Appendix 5C-3.5 Coral
Appendix 5C-3.5.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.5.2 Protection Against Coral
Appendix 5C-3.5.3 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.6 Octopuses
Appendix 5C-3.6.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.6.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.7 Segmented Worms (Annelida) (Examples: Bloodworm, Bristleworm)
Appendix 5C-3.7.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.7.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.8 Sea Urchins
Appendix 5C-3.8.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.8.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.9 Cone Shells
Appendix 5C-3.9.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.9.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.10 Sea Snakes
Appendix 5C-3.10.1 Sea Snake Bite Effects
Appendix 5C-3.10.2 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.10.3 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-3.11 Sponges
Appendix 5C-3.11.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-3.11.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4 POISONOUS MARINE ANIMALS
Appendix 5C-4.1 Ciguatera Fish Poisoning
Appendix 5C-4.1.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.1.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.2 Scombroid Fish Poisoning
Appendix 5C-4.2.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.2.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.3 Puffer (Fugu) Fish Poisoning Appendix
Appendix 5C-4.3.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.3.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.4 Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) (Red Tide)
Appendix 5C-4.4.1 Symptoms
Appendix 5C-4.4.2 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.4.3 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.5 Bacterial and Viral Diseases from Shellfish
Appendix 5C-4.5.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.5.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.6 Sea Cucumbers Appendix
Appendix 5C-4.6.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-4.6.2 First Aid and Treatment
Appendix 5C-4.7 Parasitic Infestation
Appendix 5C-4.7.1 Prevention
Appendix 5C-5 REFERENCES FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION



Pär Ahlgren
Pär Ahlgren
2008-07-18 09:02:24
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Huvudinlägg Recension: "U.S. NAVY DIVING MANUAL" Pär Ahlgren 2008-07-18 09:00
svara Fullständig innehållsförteckning – för intresseradPär Ahlgren2008-07-18 09:02
svara Ändringar i rev 6 på rubriknivå - för intresseradePär Ahlgren2008-07-18 09:04
svara Sv: Recension: "U.S. NAVY DIVING MANUAL"Jonas Andersson2008-07-18 09:20
svara Sv: Recension: "U.S. NAVY DIVING MANUAL"Peter Steinhoff2008-07-18 09:49
svara Sv: Sv: Recension: "U.S. NAVY DIVING MANUAL"Peter Steinhoff2008-07-18 10:12

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